It then, you could say that it was fairly

It is no secret that the
United States of America was built on individuals from other countries
immigrating to America hundreds of years ago. Back then, you could say that it
was fairly easy for someone from another country to gain citizenship in the United
States; now, that is not necessarily the case. For many, one of the biggest
reasons for refugees to make the move to the United States is because they are
in search of a better life. Many war-torn countries, third-world countries, and
poverty stricken areas have many individuals who attempt to immigrate.
Political campaigns, news outlets, and social media have all talked about
(mostly) the struggle for refugees to gain citizenship. Many immigrants
consider the United States, a “unique country that stands for something special in the
world,” (“What Immigrants Say”). Because the United States was built on
those looking for a better  life, it should be more attainable for
immigrants to gain citizenship in the United States of America.

            In, Building a Transcontinental Railroad,
the argument of immigrants replacing the United States workforce is one of the main
issues in the literature. Today, many people feel that those from other
countries are doing the same thing. The argument that immigrants who gain
citizenship then live off the United States government’s welfare are often the
people who also think that immigrants are taking natural born citizens jobs.
How can they stay off welfare without obtaining a job? This argument is
disproved in many ways. First of all, so many immigrants have started their own
businesses. According to The Huffington Post, immigrants are twice as
likely to start their own business than those born in the United States, (The
Huffington Post). Because of the economic status and recent recover of the
mid-2000s depression, it has motivated immigrants to find work on their own,
literally.

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            Often times, the difficulty of
gaining United States citizenship can take years. Applications, tests, and
interviews are all a part of the citizenship process (“How Difficult Is”). The citizenship test
is a difficult one. My uncle married my aunt who is from South Korea and she described
the citizenship test as very difficult. Many United States born citizens may
not even be able to pass it. In a study done by Xavier University, one in three
natural born Americans fails the naturalization test (www.usnews.com). If that is the statistic,
why must the test be so difficult for those born in a country they wish they
were not born in?

In this era, the word “immigration” usually has a negative
connotation to it. This is because when many people think of immigrants, they
think of illegal aliens that reside in the United States. Most illegal
immigrants come to the United States for better jobs and to get a better life.
Over 10 million undocumented immigrants currently reside in the United States
(Johnson, Kirk). So many immigrants would not come to the US illegally if it
was not such a difficult process to come in legally.