Jesselyn how to cook. She taught him many things

Jesselyn SjahCulinary 1Chef Rosen Period 215 January, 2017Marcus Samuelsson    Born on January 25, 1971 in Ethiopia, Samuelsson started from humble beginnings. In 1972, tuberculosis struck his family which affected his sister, Linda, his mother, and himself; tragically his mother did not make it. A year later Samuelsson and his sister were adopted by Ann Marie and Lennart Samuelsson, who brought them to Sweden. The couple already had an eight year old foster child, Anna; born to a Swedish mother and a Jamaican father. Samuelsson was originally born with the name Kassahun and his sister Fantaye; they were given the Swedish names Marcus and Linda. For many months, Linda acted as Samuelsson’s protector because although she trusted Anna, she did not trust her new parents. Eventually, Linda slowly opened up to them. While in Sweden this was where Samuelsson’s passion towards cooking and food was introduced to him. His father grew up in a family of fisherman, so naturally, skills of being able to tell which fish to pick out from the market were passed to Samuelsson. Samuelsson’s passion for food did not come from his mother as she was busy juggling three kids and their multitude of extra curriculars such as soccer and ice skating. His mother was not a bad cook per se, she just did not have the time. It was from his grandmother, Helga a professional chef, that he learned how to cook. She taught him many things such as how to pickle vegetables, make meatballs, desserts, and jams; this was where Samuelsson learned to appreciate and love fresh and local foods.In 1989 after studying at the Culinary Institute in Gothenburg, Sweden, Samuelsson apprenticed in Switzerland. He then went to France in 1993 where he apprenticed at some of the world’s best restaurants. During the same year, his grandmother Helga passed away, Samuelsson says that , “He owes her his inspiration and dedicates his passion to her” (SOURCE). A year later, 1994, he arrives in America for an apprenticeship with Aquavit. This was where Samuelsson had to work his way up and it paid off because it resulted in him receiving a 3-star rating from the New York Times as the Executive Chef of Aquavit. Samuelsson was 23 at the time of him earning this reward- this made him the youngest person of that time to every do so. To further add on to Samuelsson’s achievements, in 1994 he was awarded the Rising Star Chef Award from the James Beard Foundation. He has earned so far a total of four James Beard Awards for Rising Star Chef and Best Chef: New York City and for Best International Cookbook in 1999, 2003 and 2007. In 2000, he went back to Ethiopia where he met his biological father, Tsegie and his eight brothers and sisters that he never knew he had. During this trip, he saw how hard the people in Ethiopia worked and how fortunate he was to be living in the US. Alongside with his grandmother, Samuelsson’s relatives and his father, Tsegie were the other forces who pushed him for his passion in cooking. Nine years later, he returns to Ethiopia where he married Gate Maya Haile