Tanzania and has a population of about 55.57 million

Tanzania also better known as the United Republic of Tanzania  is a state in eastern Africa.  Tanzania was created as a clipped compound of the names of the two states, Tanganyika and Zanzibar, that unified to create the country. The capital of Tanzania is Dodoma, but priorly was Dar es Salaam. It is around 365,000 square miles and has a population of about 55.57 million people. The savannah covers over half of the country and  the rest is covered by semi-desert. However 38 percent of the land is set aside s protective areas for conservation. The climate in the highlands is usually around 50-68 degrees and the rest barely ever goes below 68 degrees. That is a little background information to help you understand Tanzania better. Medical Treatment/BeliefsReligious Beliefs/Ceremonies/PracticesDiet and NutritionLanguageTanzania is a multilingual country. There are a total of 126 languages spoken in Tanzania. Two are institutional, 18 are developing, 58 are vigorous, 40 are endangered, and 8 are dying. There are also three languages that recently became extinct.  Tanzania’s official language is Swahili. The language is used in all spheres of life, including music, education, politics, legal affairs, technology, business, media, and film production. English is a widely spoken language as well as other native tongues of various ethnic groups.Major languages spoken in Tanzania include:Niger-Congo, Bantu, Bemba, Safwa, Bena, Chaga, Digo, Gogo, Haya, Hehe, Iramba, Luguru, Makonde, Nyakyusa, Nyamwezi, Nyika, Sonjo, Sukuma, Swahili, Turu, Yao, Nilo-Saharan, Nilotic, Datooga, Kisankasa, Maasai, Ngasa, Ogiek, and Pare. Languages spoken by the country’s ethnic minorities include: Khoisan, Khoe, Hadza, Sandawe, Afro-Asiatic, Cushitic, Alagwa, Burunge, Gorowa, Iraqw, Semitic, Arabic, Indo-European, Indo-Iranian, Gujarati, Hindustani, Germanic, English, Romance, French, and Portuguese. Several sign languages are used by more than 280,000 members of the Tanzanian deaf community. Various forms of sign languages have been used both in education and in communication since 1963. While most schools for the deaf use sign language, others teach lip-reading.